Progressive Politics Research and Commentary by Janette Rainwater
 
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    Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu The U.S. NATO War on Yugoslavia (May 6,1999)
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    Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu How Milosevic Became the New "Hitler"
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     Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu The Return: A Book for Frances about Life and Death
           Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu  Preface
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  Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu You're in Charge: A Guide to Becoming Your Own Therapist
           Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu Introduction: The Art of Self Observation
           Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu  On Dreaming
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  Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu Since the New Deal: An Annotated Chronology of the Events That Have Changed the United States
           Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu  The C.I.A. (excerpt)
           Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu  Origins of the Cold War (excerpt)
           Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu  Some Quotations that Demonstrate the Underlying Philosophy Since the New Deal

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     Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu Afghanistan, "Terrorism," and Blowback
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   Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu The Starr Chamber and the Future of Democracy (September 16, 1998)
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   Minus Button which collapses the expandable menu Warren Beatty's Blueprint for a Democratic Party
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Warren Beatty Speech
Upon Being Honored by Southern California Americans for Democratic Action at the Eleanor Roosevelt Annual Awards Dinner
Beverly Hilton Hotel
September 29, 1999

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Thank you, Norman, not only for your kind words about me, but for your contribution to political discourse with People for the American Way and for your unique work in film and television, all of which have won you the President's National Medal of the Arts Award earlier today at the White House. So thank you for jumping on a plane and whipping back to Los Angeles to present this award to me.

Lila, I want to thank you and the Americans for Democratic Action for honoring me.

Of your founders, I've already been greatly honored with the friendship of Hubert Humphrey and Arthur Schlessinger, Jr. I've revered the late Walter Reuther as I do Mr. Galbraith. But the woman, other than my mother, I always admired most in my childhood, Eleanor Roosevelt, I never got to meet. Although had I been a little less wary one day in New York in 1961, it's possible I would have.

My first movie had just come out, I was walking up Fifth Avenue, a boy from Virginia unused to being recognized, when out of nowhere there burst a rather frazzled, hyperactive, overly intense man in his 20s who yanked me by the arm, and with what seemed to me a crazy glint in his eye, whispered, "Mrs. Roosevelt wants me to talk to you. I'm going over to see her now. Come on, you want to see Mrs. Roosevelt......."

I said, "Oh sure, thank you, thank you, I'd love to see Mrs. Roosevelt but I'm a little late for a... I have a; uh; a thing."

Now he grabs both of my sleeves, sweat streaming down his face, and said, "No, no, Mrs. Roosevelt is a friend of mine. She says you should do my book. She's a friend of mine."

I said, "Well, I think that it's very nice that Mrs. Roosevelt is a friend of yours. Say hello for me. But if you don't mind, would you let go of my sleeves?"

And as I pulled away from him, he shoved a book in my hands and said, "Read it. Read it."

As soon as I got a safe distance up Fifth Avenue from him, I slowed down and opened the book. It was called "Brutal Mandate" and sure enough there was a blurb on the inside cover by Mrs. Roosevelt.

The guy who had stopped me was the late Al Lowenstein, later to become a Congressman and the president of your organization and a good friend of mine. You remember him well, I know, and with great affection. Al had the ability to lead. He was the person most responsible for beginning the movement protesting President Johnson's policy in Vietnam. There was no more effective organizer of dissent than Al.

For those of us who shared in that activism, there is a lot to be proud of. Insofar as it changed our policy in Vietnam, it was a success.

What we didn't succeed in doing, sadly, was to get a fair shake for the domestic policies of Lyndon Johnson because the country couldn't afford to pay for those good programs and that bad war at the same time.

The cost of the war in Vietnam brought into question the cost of food stamps at home.

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This site was last changed November 28, 2001. It was created on March 20, 1997.

© Janette Rainwater 1997-2001

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